Fluorescence imaging of microbe-containing particles shot from a two-stage Light-gas gun into an aerogel

Yuko Kawaguchi, Tomohiro Sugino, Makoto Tabata, Kyoko Okudaira, Eichi Imai, Hajime Yano, Sunao Hasegawa, Hirofumi Hashimoto, Hikaru Yabuta, Kensei Kobayashi, Hideyuki Kawai, Hajime Mita, Shin ichi Yokobori, Akihiko Yamagishi

    • 3 Citations

    Abstract

    We have proposed an experiment (the Tanpopo mission) to capture microbes on the Japan Experimental Module of the International Space Station. An ultra low-density silica aerogel will be exposed to space for more than 1 year. After retrieving the aerogel, particle tracks and particles found in it will be visualized by fluorescence microscopy after staining it with a DNA-specific fluorescence dye. In preparation for this study, we simulated particle trapping in an aerogel so that methods could be developed to visualize the particles and their tracks. During the Tanpopo mission, particles that have an orbital velocity of ~8 km/s are expected to collide with the aerogel. To simulate these collisions, we shot Deinococcus radiodurans-containing Lucentite particles into the aerogel from a two-stage light-gas gun (acceleration 4.2 km/s). The shapes of the captured particles, and their tracks and entrance holes were recorded with a microscope/camera system for further analysis. The size distribution of the captured particles was smaller than the original distribution, suggesting that the particles had fragmented. We were able to distinguish between microbial DNA and inorganic compounds after staining the aerogel with the DNA-specific fluorescence dye SYBR green I as the fluorescence of the stained DNA and the autofluorescence of the inorganic particles decay at different rates. The developed methods are suitable to determine if microbes exist at the International Space Station altitude. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)43-60
    Number of pages18
    JournalOrigins of Life and Evolution of Biospheres
    Volume44
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2014 Jan 1

    Fingerprint

    fluorescence
    DNA
    dye
    gas
    inorganic compound
    trapping
    microscopy
    silica
    collision
    experiment

    Keywords

    • Aerogel
    • DNA-specific fluorescence dye
    • Hypervelocity impact experiment
    • Space experiment

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
    • Space and Planetary Science

    Cite this

    Kawaguchi, Y., Sugino, T., Tabata, M., Okudaira, K., Imai, E., Yano, H., ... Yamagishi, A. (2014). Fluorescence imaging of microbe-containing particles shot from a two-stage Light-gas gun into an aerogel. Origins of Life and Evolution of Biospheres, 44(1), 43-60. DOI: 10.1007/s11084-014-9361-x

    Fluorescence imaging of microbe-containing particles shot from a two-stage Light-gas gun into an aerogel. / Kawaguchi, Yuko; Sugino, Tomohiro; Tabata, Makoto; Okudaira, Kyoko; Imai, Eichi; Yano, Hajime; Hasegawa, Sunao; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yabuta, Hikaru; Kobayashi, Kensei; Kawai, Hideyuki; Mita, Hajime; Yokobori, Shin ichi; Yamagishi, Akihiko.

    In: Origins of Life and Evolution of Biospheres, Vol. 44, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 43-60.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Kawaguchi, Y, Sugino, T, Tabata, M, Okudaira, K, Imai, E, Yano, H, Hasegawa, S, Hashimoto, H, Yabuta, H, Kobayashi, K, Kawai, H, Mita, H, Yokobori, SI & Yamagishi, A 2014, 'Fluorescence imaging of microbe-containing particles shot from a two-stage Light-gas gun into an aerogel' Origins of Life and Evolution of Biospheres, vol 44, no. 1, pp. 43-60. DOI: 10.1007/s11084-014-9361-x
    Kawaguchi Y, Sugino T, Tabata M, Okudaira K, Imai E, Yano H et al. Fluorescence imaging of microbe-containing particles shot from a two-stage Light-gas gun into an aerogel. Origins of Life and Evolution of Biospheres. 2014 Jan 1;44(1):43-60. Available from, DOI: 10.1007/s11084-014-9361-x

    Kawaguchi, Yuko; Sugino, Tomohiro; Tabata, Makoto; Okudaira, Kyoko; Imai, Eichi; Yano, Hajime; Hasegawa, Sunao; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yabuta, Hikaru; Kobayashi, Kensei; Kawai, Hideyuki; Mita, Hajime; Yokobori, Shin ichi; Yamagishi, Akihiko / Fluorescence imaging of microbe-containing particles shot from a two-stage Light-gas gun into an aerogel.

    In: Origins of Life and Evolution of Biospheres, Vol. 44, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 43-60.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    AU - Sugino,Tomohiro

    AU - Tabata,Makoto

    AU - Okudaira,Kyoko

    AU - Imai,Eichi

    AU - Yano,Hajime

    AU - Hasegawa,Sunao

    AU - Hashimoto,Hirofumi

    AU - Yabuta,Hikaru

    AU - Kobayashi,Kensei

    AU - Kawai,Hideyuki

    AU - Mita,Hajime

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