A kinetic study of the formation of organic solids from formaldehyde: Implications for the origin of extraterrestrial organic solids in primitive Solar System objects

Yoko Kebukawa, George D. Cody

  • 2 Citations

Abstract

Aqueous organic solid formation from formaldehyde via the formose reaction and subsequent reactions is a possible candidate for the origin of complex primitive chondritic insoluble organic matter (IOM) and refractory carbon in comets. The rate of formation of organic solids from formaldehyde was studied as a function of temperature and time, with and without ammonia, in order to derive kinetic expressions for polymer yield. The evolution in molecular structure as a function of time and temperature was studied using infrared spectroscopy. Using these kinetic expressions, the yield of organic solids is estimated for extended time and temperature ranges. For example, the half-life for organic solid formation is ~5days at 373K, ~200days at 323K, and ~70years at 273K with ammonia, and ~25days at 373K, ~13years at 323K, and ~2×104years at 273K without ammonia. These results indicate that organic solids could form during the aqueous alteration in meteorite parent bodies. If liquid water existed early in the interiors of Kuiper belt objects (KBOs), formaldehyde could convert into organic solids at temperatures close to 273K, and possibly even below 273K in the ammonia-water system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)412-423
Number of pages12
JournalIcarus
Volume248
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015 Mar 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

formaldehyde
ammonia
temperature
kinetics
water
parent body
infrared spectroscopy
half life
meteorite
comet
polymer
organic matter
liquid
carbon

Keywords

  • Asteroids
  • Comets
  • Kuiper belt
  • Meteorites
  • Organic chemistry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics

Cite this

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N2 - Aqueous organic solid formation from formaldehyde via the formose reaction and subsequent reactions is a possible candidate for the origin of complex primitive chondritic insoluble organic matter (IOM) and refractory carbon in comets. The rate of formation of organic solids from formaldehyde was studied as a function of temperature and time, with and without ammonia, in order to derive kinetic expressions for polymer yield. The evolution in molecular structure as a function of time and temperature was studied using infrared spectroscopy. Using these kinetic expressions, the yield of organic solids is estimated for extended time and temperature ranges. For example, the half-life for organic solid formation is ~5days at 373K, ~200days at 323K, and ~70years at 273K with ammonia, and ~25days at 373K, ~13years at 323K, and ~2×104years at 273K without ammonia. These results indicate that organic solids could form during the aqueous alteration in meteorite parent bodies. If liquid water existed early in the interiors of Kuiper belt objects (KBOs), formaldehyde could convert into organic solids at temperatures close to 273K, and possibly even below 273K in the ammonia-water system.

AB - Aqueous organic solid formation from formaldehyde via the formose reaction and subsequent reactions is a possible candidate for the origin of complex primitive chondritic insoluble organic matter (IOM) and refractory carbon in comets. The rate of formation of organic solids from formaldehyde was studied as a function of temperature and time, with and without ammonia, in order to derive kinetic expressions for polymer yield. The evolution in molecular structure as a function of time and temperature was studied using infrared spectroscopy. Using these kinetic expressions, the yield of organic solids is estimated for extended time and temperature ranges. For example, the half-life for organic solid formation is ~5days at 373K, ~200days at 323K, and ~70years at 273K with ammonia, and ~25days at 373K, ~13years at 323K, and ~2×104years at 273K without ammonia. These results indicate that organic solids could form during the aqueous alteration in meteorite parent bodies. If liquid water existed early in the interiors of Kuiper belt objects (KBOs), formaldehyde could convert into organic solids at temperatures close to 273K, and possibly even below 273K in the ammonia-water system.

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KW - Kuiper belt

KW - Meteorites

KW - Organic chemistry

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